zigzag Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "zigzag" - English Dictionary

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zigzagnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈzɪɡ.zæɡ/

zigzag noun [C] (LINE)

a line or pattern that looks like a Z or a row of Zs joined together: a zigzag path/road/coastline a fabric with a zigzag pattern The children ran in zigzags around the playground until they were exhausted.

zigzag noun [C] (CHANGE)

a situation in which actions, plans, or ideas change suddenly and completely, and then change back again equally suddenly: The Washington Post complained of "two weeks of policy zigzags". The country seems to have been following a zigzag course between democracy and dictatorship.

zigzagverb [I]

uk   us   /ˈzɪɡ.zæɡ/ (-gg-)

zigzag verb [I] (MAKE SHAPE)

(also zig and zag) to make a movement or shape like a zigzag: The road zigzags along a rocky coastline.

zigzag verb [I] (CHANGE)

to change suddenly and completely, and then change back again equally suddenly: The market zigzagged during the day but finished higher in the afternoon.
Translations of “zigzag”
in Arabic خَط مُتَعَرِّج…
in Korean 지그재그…
in Malaysian berliku-liku…
in French zigzag…
in Turkish zikzak…
in Italian zig-zag…
in Chinese (Traditional) 線條, 鋸齒形線條, 之字形…
in Russian зигзаг…
in Polish zygzak…
in Vietnamese ngoằn ngèo…
in Spanish zigzag…
in Portuguese ziguezague…
in Thai เป็นรูปฟันปลา…
in German Zickzack-……
in Catalan ziga-zaga…
in Japanese ジグザグ…
in Indonesian berkelok-kelok…
in Chinese (Simplified) 线条, 锯齿形线条, 之字形…
(Definition of zigzag from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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