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English definition of “access”

access

noun [U]
 
 
/ˈækses/
the right or opportunity to use or receive something: get/have/provide access to sth Community radio stations have access to public funding. Everyone is entitled to fair access to employment.
the right or ability to look at documents and information: allow/grant/give sb access to sth She was granted access to the official archives.gain access to sth You can gain access to your records via this website.deny/restrict access to sth They planned to restrict access to their website content with the use of a subscription system. Merchants have online access to their product data. Auditors have unrestricted access to all records.
IT the ability to use a system such as the internet, or the way in which you can do this: access to sth Do you have access to the internet? Business travellers expect free internet access. broadband/wireless access
the method or possibility of getting to or entering a place: access to sth The site has easy access to the motorway. The premises are equipped for disabled access.
COMMERCE the right or ability to buy and sell goods in a particular country or market: access to sth Our website gives us access to global markets.
BANKING the right to use a bank account, or to remove money from a bank account or an investment: access to sth Some accounts allow instant access to your savings.
LAW the legal right to see your child or children, or other family member, especially after a divorce: access to sb Many fathers go to court to seek access to their children.
→ See also open-access, wheelchair access
(Definition of access noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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