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English definition of “advance”

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advance

noun
 
 
/ədˈvɑːns/
[C or U] an improvement relating to a particular activity or area of knowledge: Doctors believe that the findings represent a major advance in treating heart disease. The government's White Paper embodies the hopes of those who believe in the advance of the digital age.technological/medical/economic advances What has been the impact of technological advances on the securities markets?advances in sth Advances in drilling and production technologies have significantly reduced the risk of a major oil spill.
[C] FINANCE money that is paid to a person or organization before the usual time or before a piece of work is finished: Loans and advances usually represent the single largest asset of most banks. Publishers generally pay an advance once the author finishes the manuscript. The US singer will receive a $17.5m cash advance on signing the 10-year contract.
[C] FINANCE, STOCK MARKET an increase in the price or value of something such as a share or a currency: Declining stocks easily defeated advances 413 to 302.advance in sth Every one yen advance in the Japanese currency's value against the dollar could reduce current profits by as much as five billion yen.
in advance (of sth) before something else happens or is done: Ticket prices are cheaper if bought in advance. Rating agencies issued statements of the city's financial condition in advance of this week's sale of $500 million in bonds. →  See also bank advance
(Definition of advance noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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