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English definition of “build”

build

verb
 
 
/bɪld/ (built, built)
[I or T] to make a building or other structure by putting different parts or materials together: New offices were built downtown to house the company's headquarters. The city plans to build three new parking structures next to the airport. build cars/planes/machinery, etc.
[T] to create something from a collection of ideas, plans, information, people, etc.: build a website/network build a company/team/department
[T] (also build up) to develop something gradually so that it becomes larger, more powerful, more successful, etc.: build up a career/business/brand He moved to London where he built up a successful career in journalism.
[T] IT to create a computer program: Researchers have built a sophisticated computer program to search for answers.
build a case LAW to collect facts and information in order to prove in a court of law that someone is guilty or not guilty: build a case for/against sb Investigators are working to build a case against the three suspects.
be built to flip if a company is built to flip, the owner plans to sell it soon after creating it in order to make a profit quickly: Some companies are built to flip, so there is hardly any investment in research and development.
be built to last if something is built to last, it is made, designed, or planned so well that it continues to exist or stay successful for a very long time: Our products are built to last and come with a lifetime guarantee.
(Definition of build verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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