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English definition of “card”

card

noun [C]
 
 
/kɑːd/
COMMERCE, BANKING a small rectangular piece of plastic given to a customer by a bank or store that allows them to make payments, take money from their account, etc.: pay with a/use a/pay by card You can pay by credit or debit card. Most businesses won't accept cheques without a card. He lost his wallet and had to cancel all his cards. Would you rather pay cash or put it on your card? When she tried to get money from the machine, her card was refused.
WORKPLACE a small piece of plastic or stiff paper with your signature, photograph, and often other electronic information on it that proves who you are, allows you to enter a particular place, etc.: You have to swipe your card to get into the building. The new style of driver's licence comes with a photo ID card.
(also business card) WORKPLACE, MEETINGS a small card that has your name, company name, and the job you do printed on it: He shook my hand politely and gave me his card.
IT a small electronic object that is part of a computer or can be connected to it, making it able to do a particular thing: If you have your own computer, you can hire ethernet cards from the college to connect to the network. An audio interface can be a simple card that plugs into your computer to allow you to route the sound out to your speakers.
→ See also affinity card, bank card, cash card, charge card, cheque card, credit card, debit card, expansion card, gold card, graphics card, green card, greetings card, ID card, identity card, index card, loyalty card, membership card, memory card, network card, payment card, railcard, SIMM, smart card, sound card, store card, stored value card, swipe card, time card, top-up card
(Definition of card from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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