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English definition of “change”

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change

verb
 
 
/tʃeɪndʒ/
[I or T] to become or make something different, or to exchange something for something else: The company has changed considerably since I joined in 2005. She decided that it was time to change jobs.
[T] MONEY to exchange an amount of money for the same value in another currency: If you're unable to change money before you travel, most international airports will have a bureau de change.change sth into sth Here you'll find the best exchange rate for changing your US dollars into euros.
[T] MONEY to exchange a unit of money for coins or smaller units of paper money that add up to the same value: Could you change this twenty dollar bill for a ten and two fives? Many superstores have change machines where you can change your coins into banknotes.
[T] UK COMMERCE to return something you bought to a store and exchange it for something new, for example because it was damaged or the wrong size. A store changes an item when it agrees to give a customer a new item in exchange for one that is damaged, etc.: Some places won't let you change items without a receipt. The store offered to change the faulty items or refund my money.
change hands to pass from one owner to another: More than 30 million shares changed hands in the first hour of business.
(Definition of change verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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