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English definition of “claw (sth) back”

claw (sth) back

phrasal verb with claw
 
 
/klɔː/ verb
STOCK MARKET if a share price claws back, or claws back a particular amount, it slowly increases after it has gone down: The firm clawed back 15p of Monday's 60p decline to reach 397p. The Mexican stock market clawed back from early losses.
FINANCE if a government or company claws back money it has already paid, it takes it back: Could it be that the present basic pension will be raised, only to be clawed back in tax from the better-off? Policyholders voted to claw back the bonus income paid out to the directors last year
to succeed in getting back something that was taken from you: The telecom giant clawed back market share from its top two competitors.
UK STOCK MARKET to offer investors who already own shares in a company the right to buy some of the shares that it has offered to new investors
(Definition of claw (sth) back from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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