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English definition of “code”

code

noun
 
 
/kəʊd/
[C or U] a set or system of numbers, letters, or signs which is known only to particular people and represents something that is secret: access/security code You need an access code to get into the building.in code The message was written in code.
[C] a system of words, letters, or signs which is used to represent something so that it is easy to know which thing or type of thing it is: product/identification code The FDA Product Code describes a product or a group of products. We will give you a unique code to use when you make a booking.
[U] IT the letters, numbers, words, and symbols used for writing computer programs: computer/digital code Java computer code write/generate/execute code
[C] a set of principles, or a set of rules which state how people in a particular organization, job, etc. should behave: abide by/follow a code All our members follow a strict professional code. He has his own moral code for the way he does business. a code of behaviour/conduct
[C, usually singular] LAW a set of rules or laws: the state's legal code Their aim is to work out a code to end sweatshops.
→ See also area code, authorization code, bar code, building code, business activity code, City Code, dialling code, dress code, error code, Internal Revenue Code, machine code, sort code, source code, tax code, Universal Product Code
(Definition of code from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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