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English definition of “confidence”

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confidence

noun [U]
 
 
/ˈkɒnfɪdəns/
a feeling that you can trust someone or something to work well or behave as you expect: The index fell 3.1% as investors lost confidence in bank shares.have confidence in sb/sth "I have the utmost confidence in him, and know he will lead this franchise to continued success and growth," West said. Leitch warns that the insurance industry must raise standards to win back the confidence of investors.
a feeling that an economic situation will improve: Business confidence has plunged and home sales have collapsed.destroy/restore confidence Yesterday's announcement is a timely and important step toward restoring global economic confidence.
the quality of being certain of your own ability to do things well: Our latest recruit is very intelligent but lacking in confidence.boost/shatter/shake sb's confidence One aim of the appraisal meetings is to boost the confidence of your team members.
in confidence if you tell someone something in confidence, it is with the agreement that they will not tell anyone else: Insiders are barred from using significant business information that they have received in confidence.
→  See also breach of confidence , consumer confidence , vote of confidence , vote of no confidence
(Definition of confidence from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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