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English definition of “copy”

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copy

noun
 
 
/ˈkɒpi/
[C] COMMERCE a single book, newspaper, CD, or other printed or recorded product, of which many have been produced: The 600-page volume has become an instant hit, selling 250,000 copies since its publication in October.a copy of sth Order your copy of her new album today! The company is offering a free copy of their anti-virus software.
[C] a document or other printed material that is exactly the same as another one, produced, for example, by using a photocopier or printing it more than once from a computer: Enclosed is a signed copy of the contract.make/take a copy I will need to take a copy of your passport.
[C] IT a computer file, document, etc. that is created to be exactly the same as another one: Before working on the file, make a copy and save it in another folder.
[C] COMMERCE a product that is made to look the same as another product, especially illegally: If you look closely at the label, you can tell it's a copy. The factories were for making illegal copies of software, CDs, and DVDs. →  Compare bootleg , pirate
[U] MARKETING the words used in advertising to help sell a product: The advertising copy is tested with consumer surveys.
[U] writing that is going to be printed in a book, magazine, etc.: The copy will be checked several times before publication.
→  See also advance copy , body copy , carbon copy , certified copy , hard copy , knocking copy , office copy , top copy
(Definition of copy noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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