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English definition of “cut”

cut

verb [T]
 
 
/kʌt/ (cutting, cut, cut)
to make something lower, smaller, shorter, etc.: cut sth (from sth) (to sth) We have cut our wage bill from £12,000 to £8,000 per week.cut sth (from sth) We need to cut 50% from our advertising budget.cut sth (by sth) The manufacturing group aims to cut its carbon emissions by 20% over the next five years. cut jobs/staff/the workforce Schmitz Chemicals plans to cut 20,000 jobs worldwide. cut borrowing/costs/spending cut output/production → See also price-cutting
to remove something from a document, especially from a document on a computer screen: The report is too long – I need to cut 500 words. I'll cut and paste some photos from our online catalogue into my presentation.
cut a deal to reach an agreement: The carmaker has cut a deal with unions to limit pay rises.
cut both/two ways to work in two ways, or to have two opposite effects: Setting prices high cuts both ways – it could lose some customers, but it also suggests high-quality.
cut corners to do something in a way that saves time or money, but that reduces quality: If a restaurant cuts corners on ingredients, it will lose customers.
cut it informal to successfully do what you are asked to do: Some people work well under pressure; others can't cut it. For heavy office use, this printer just doesn't cut it.
cut it/things fine informal to leave very little, or not enough, time to do something: It's two o'clock now, so you're cutting it fine if you need to be at the airport by three.
cut your losses to avoid losing any more money than you have already lost: The manufacturer has decided to cut its losses and sell its unprofitable divisions.
(Definition of cut verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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