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English definition of “debit”

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debit

noun
 
 
/ˈdebɪt/
[C] BANKING an amount of money that is taken out of a bank account, etc.: Once your contract with them ends, the company should no longer take monthly debits from your account. The statement showed a debit of £350 on January 22. →  Compare credit
[U] BANKING the system of taking money from a bank account, etc., for example, by using a debit card: When you swipe your card at the checkout line, you'll be asked if you want to pay by debit or credit. debit payment/transaction/purchase I had lost the original invoice but I still had the debit receipt. →  See also direct debit
[C] ( abbreviation Deb, deb) ACCOUNTING an amount recorded that is recorded in a company's financial accounts which represents money that has been used to pay an expense or buy an asset. In double-entry bookkeeping debits are recorded on the left-hand side (= the debit side) of the accounts: One of the principles of accounting is that the debits recorded in a ledger should equal or balance the credits in it. →  Compare credit
in debit BANKING if a bank account, etc. is in debit, more money has been taken out of it than was originally put into it or paid: These transactions had put his account in debit.
Translations of “debit”
in Korean 인출액…
in Arabic دَين…
in French débit…
in Turkish hesaptan çekilen para…
in Italian addebito…
in Chinese (Traditional) 借項…
in Russian дебет…
in Polish wypłata, debet…
in Spanish débito…
in Portuguese débito…
in German die Belastung…
in Catalan càrrec, dèbit…
in Japanese (お金の)引落とし…
in Chinese (Simplified) 借项, 借记…
(Definition of debit noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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