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English definition of “deep”

deep

adjective [usually before noun]
 
 
/diːp/
very large or serious: Employees were forced to accept deep cuts in pay and benefits. a deep recession. These deep discounts will be a major factor in stimulating local telephone competition in Pennsylvania.
in deep trouble experiencing very serious problems: But the question is whether any business strategy can save a company in such deep trouble.
be in/get into deep water to be in or get into serious trouble: The main problem's going to be cash flow. It's the same in any business that gets into deep water.
deep in debt owing a very large amount of money: Why are the banks willing to allow people like this to get even deeper into debt?
deep pockets if you say that an organization or a person has deep pockets, you mean that they have a lot of money to spend: The sleek new car promises to do well, but it takes deep pockets to market premium cars across Europe.
jump in/throw sb in at the deep end to start, or make someone start, doing something new and difficult without help or preparation: When new people start in our call centre, we give them basic training in all our systems and then throw them in at the deep end on day one.
(Definition of deep from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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