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English definition of “developed”

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developed

adjective
 
 
/dɪˈveləpt/
advanced or powerful: Bolivia's energy sector is not as developed as that of Venezuela. The electronics market here is far more developed than in any other Western country of comparable size.
ECONOMICS having a lot of industrial activity and a strong economy: Global deflation is squeezing profits and extinguishing jobs in the developed world. Portable devices became big sellers in developed markets as music went digital. Many companies in less developed regions are growing much faster than our own. developed nations/economies →  Compare developing
PROPERTY developed areas have houses, stores, factories, etc. on them: The coast is now heavily developed. developed land a developed area
NATURAL RESOURCES used to describe places from which natural resources are taken: The area contains five developed gas and oil fields.
Translations of “developed”
in Korean 발달한, 선진의…
in Arabic مُتقدّم…
in Portuguese desenvolvido…
in Catalan desenvolupat…
in Japanese (国が)先進の…
in Italian sviluppato…
in Chinese (Traditional) 高級的,發達的, 強大的…
in Chinese (Simplified) 高级的,发达的, 强大的…
(Definition of developed from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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