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English definition of “discharge”

discharge

verb
 
 
/dɪsˈtʃɑːdʒ/
[T] to give someone an official order or legal permission to end their duty in the army, a court, a prison, etc.: The judge discharged the jury and ordered a retrial. He was honourably discharged from the Army three years ago.
[T] HR if a company or organization discharges an employee, it makes them leave their job: discharge sb for sth Several of the directors were later discharged for mismanaging shareholder funds. → Compare fire
[T] LAW, FINANCE to give a bankrupt person legal permission to stop owing a particular debt: discharge a bankrupt First-time bankrupts are typically discharged automatically after 12 months.discharge a debt Bankruptcy laws generally won't let people discharge their student loan debt. → Compare discharge in bankruptcy
[T] FINANCE to pay the total amount owed for a debt, loan, payment, etc.: The company continues to discharge its loan repayment obligations in time.
[T] to do an official task or duty: discharge a duty/responsibility/obligation
[I or T] ENVIRONMENT if a business or factory discharges gas, chemicals, liquid waste, etc., it sends these substances into the air or water: Companies must be issued a permit from the EPA before they are allowed to discharge.discharge sth into sth The mine has a federal permit to discharge mine wastewater into the river.
[I or T] TRANSPORT to take goods off a ship or plane or to allow passengers to get off: It took a whole day to discharge the ship.
(Definition of discharge verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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