Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “drive”

drive

verb [T]     /draɪv/ (drove, driven)
to cause or influence something: be driven by sth The country needs to shift from export-led growth to growth driven by domestic demand. This company is driven by customers and by the markets in which we do our business.
to cause something to progress, develop, or grow stronger: The firm said it would drive sales by switching into larger premises while closing smaller stores. The company yesterday reported record iron ore production for the year to June, driven by a construction and manufacturing boom in China.
to force something to happen or someone to do something: drive sb/sth into/out of/to sth Analysts say these policies will drive the economy into recession. The prospect of a consumer boom helped drive the stock market to new peaks yesterday.
be in the driving seat (also be in the driver's seat) UK to be in control of a situation: With employers fighting among themselves for staff, IT workers are in the driving seat. He believes there will be consolidation in the airline industry and wants his company to be in the driver's seat of any merger.
drive a hard bargain to expect a lot in exchange for what you pay or agree to: The unions are driving a hard bargain on pay.
(Definition of drive verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Focus on the pronunciation of drive

Definitions of “drive” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

altruistic

showing a wish to help or bring advantages to others, even if it results in disadvantage for yourself

Word of the Day

Blog

Read our blog about how the English language behaves.

Learn More

New Words

Find words and meanings that have just started to be used in English, and let us know what you think of them.

Learn More