Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “effect”

effect

noun [C]
 
 
/ɪˈfekt/
the result of a particular influence: have/produce an effect Anti-inflationary measures do not yet seem to be having any effect. effect of sth (on sth) The effect of the redundancies on morale has been extremely damaging.see/feel/suffer the effects of sth Businesses are already feeling the effects of the new charges.an adverse/negative/detrimental effect The slowdown will have a detrimental effect on earnings in the short term. a significant/profound/dramatic effect reduce/minimize the effects The problem is, how to deal with the demand for more and better goods while minimizing the effect on the environment. They questioned whether financial liberalization had had the desired effect (= had done what it was intended to do).
be in effect to be active or being used: At that time a total ban on financial transactions was in effect.
come into effect (also take effect) to start working or being used: On April 1 new sales taxes will come into effect. The new credit regulations will take effect next year.
in effect in fact, or in practice: The ruling meant that, in effect, the company was allowed to continue to do business as usual.
put/bring sth into effect to start using something or making it work: The aim is to develop new management strategies and put them into effect.
with immediate effect/with effect from used to describe a change that happens immediately or from a particular date: She was appointed chief executive with immediate effect. The company has announced the appointment of 13 new partners, with effect from 1 July 2012.
effects [plural] LAW a person's possessions: After his death, an inventory was taken of his effects. Company relocation policies may cover the cost of insuring personal effects in transit.
→ See also cause and effect diagram, currency effect, demonstration effect, the domino effect, halo effect, the Hawthorne effect, income effect, price effect, ripple effect, substitution effect, threshold effect, wealth effect
(Definition of effect noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of effect?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “effect” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

bright spark

a person who is intelligent, and full of energy and enthusiasm

Word of the Day

Highly delighted, bitterly disappointed, ridiculously cheap: adverbs for emphasis.

by Liz Walter,
October 22, 2014
We often make adjectives stronger by putting an adverb in front of them. The most common ones are very and, for a stronger meaning, extremely: He was very pleased. The ship is extremely large. However, we don’t use very or extremely for adjectives that already have a strong meaning, for example fantastic,

Read More 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Read More