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English definition of “exclusion”

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exclusion

noun
 
 
/ɪksˈkluːʒən/
[C] INSURANCE an event or situation that is not included in an insurance agreement as something for which the insurance company will pay money: Many insurance policies are full of exclusions, meaning insurers can legitimately turn claims down.
[C] TAX an amount of money on which tax does not have to be paid: The current tax exclusion for capital gains on the sale of a home is $500,000 for a couple.
[C] LAW something or someone that a contract, law, or agreement does not include: Trade between EU Member States is subject to various agreements, laws, and exclusions. In the exclusion clause, the supplier totally excludes his liability under the contract for late delivery.
[U] a situation in which someone or something is prevented from entering a place or taking part in an activity: exclusion from sth However, technological advances also require workers and managers to keep updating their skills or risk exclusion from the labour market.
to the exclusion of not allowing someone or something else to be included: Under this ruling, an individual could create a corporation of which he was the sole director, to the exclusion of all other stakeholders.
Translations of “exclusion”
in Korean 배제…
in Arabic إبعاد, إقصاء…
in Portuguese exclusão…
in Catalan exclusió…
in Japanese 排除…
in Italian esclusione…
in Chinese (Traditional) 排斥, 排除, 排除在外…
in Russian недопущение, исключение…
in Turkish men etme, sokmama, hariç tutma…
in Chinese (Simplified) 排斥, 排除, 排除在外…
in Polish wykluczenie…
(Definition of exclusion from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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