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English definition of “field”

field

noun
 
 
/ˈfiːld/
[C] a subject or area that you work in or study: The assessment of microfinance programs remains an important field for researchers, policymakers, and practitioners. I will be travelling throughout the state presenting best teaching practices in my field of expertise. The institution has many top researchers in this field.
[S] a place outside an office or laboratory (= room used for scientific work) where practical work and research is done: He also trains specialists on using the software, which interprets data gathered in the field.
[C] NATURAL RESOURCES an area of land or a sea bed where minerals can be found: oil/gas/coal field Oil companies announced plans to jointly develop a new major oil field on Alaska's North Slope.
[C] IT a space in a database or file which can contain a particular type of information, for example, names or numbers: Each entry in a database activity module can have multiple fields of multiple types, e.g. a text field called 'favourite colour' .
lead the field to be in the leading position in a particular area of activity: A French company and its American subsidiary lead the field in selling such items.
level playing field a situation that is fair, because no competitor has an advantage over another: A reduction in interest rates would enable the country's manufacturers to compete on a level playing field.
outside sb's field (also not be sb's field) if something is outside someone's field, it is not a subject or type of work that they know much about: It is not uncommon to work outside your field of expertise in today's economy.
(Definition of field noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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