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English definition of “finance”

finance

noun
 
 
/ˈfaɪnæns/
[U] UK (also financing) money borrowed from an investor, bank, organization, etc. in order to pay for something: raise/get/obtain finance Other ways of raising finance include equity release on a home and flexible mortgages.arrange/provide/offer finance for sth The state-owned bank provides finance for buying homes.require/need/seek finance All of these strategies required finance.
[U] the activity or business of managing money, especially for a company or government: finance industry/sector Employment is expected to grow in finance, insurance, real estate, trade and services industries.finance minister/director/committee The finance director reported a 3% rise in sales.
[U] ECONOMICS the study of the way money is used and managed in the economy: There, he studied corporate finance and learned how to read income statements and balance sheets.
finances [plural] money that is available for a person, company, government, etc. to use, and the way that it is used: manage/control/handle your finances Many customers use online banking services to manage their finances.personal/public/government finances Recession and ill-judged tax cuts have put extra strain on the public finances. → Compare fund noun
→ See also business finance, consumer finance, corporate finance, debt finance, equity finance, high finance, mezzanine finance, mortgage finance, personal finance, project finance, public finance
(Definition of finance noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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