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English definition of “fiscal”

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fiscal

adjective
 
 
/ˈfɪskəl/
ECONOMICS, GOVERNMENT, TAX relating to government finance and taxes: fiscal challenges/ issues/problems With the serious fiscal challenges facing the federal government, agencies must maximize their ability to manage and safeguard valuable taxpayers' dollars.fiscal deficit/surplus Overall, the situation looks favourable in terms of the fiscal surplus he has projected. The governor said the fiscal crisis couldn't be solved by spending cuts alone, insisting the state needs additional revenue.
mainly US FINANCE relating to money and finances: Analysts said yesterday's settlement was unlikely to affect the company's fiscal health.
mainly US ACCOUNTING relating to a period of 12 months, or a part of that period, used by a company to calculate and report its financial information: The software company's fiscal third-quarter net income of $1.06 million, or 10 cents a share, fell short of Wall Street's expectations.
fiscal 2010/2011 etc. US ACCOUNTING, TAX the financial year 2010, etc.: Our fiscal 2009 results were challenged by the world economic downturn.
fiscally /ˈfɪskəli/ adverb
Translations of “fiscal”
in Chinese (Traditional) 財政的, 國庫的…
in Russian фискальный…
in Turkish mali, parasal…
in Chinese (Simplified) 财政的, 国库的…
in Polish fiskalny…
(Definition of fiscal from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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