fit verb - definition in the Business English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “fit”

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fit

verb
 
 
/fɪt/ (fitting, fitted, US usually fit)
[I or T] to be the right size or shape for someone or something: Their trained staff can take one look at your figure and tell you which brand of jeans is most likely to fit you.fit in/into The device is small enough to fit into a shirt pocket.
[T] to add a piece of equipment to something else: Some insurance firms offer lower premiums to people who fit security locks and alarms.fit sth on/onto/to sth You can claim money for having solar cells fitted on your home.fit sth with sth The vehicle may be fitted with a satellite tracking system.
[T] to be suitable for someone or something: You adjust your strategy to fit the business realities. Her new role fits her well. What alternatives fit the needs of the corporation and provide the best solution?
[I + adv/prep] if two or more things fit, or if one thing fits with another, they suit each other well: fit together The organization and the people must fit together.fit with sth We select individuals who are most likely to fit with the firm's culture.
[T] mainly UK to make someone or something suitable for something: fit sb/sth for sth How do you think your career to date has fitted you for this particular job?fit sb/sth to do sth Academic qualifications alone do not fit a person to become a good manager.
fit the bill to be suitable for a particular purpose: Some travel policies don't fit the bill, because they limit the amount of time you can spend abroad.
(Definition of fit verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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