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English definition of “free”

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free

adjective
 
 
/friː/
costing nothing: They received two free return air-tickets every year. Tomorrow, shoppers will receive free samples of the store's famous chocolate chip cookies.free to/for sb The Bank's 3,030 ATMs would continue to be free to everyone.
not limited or controlled: We know that freedom and opportunity can truly thrive in a free society that is also a responsible society. The website spokesperson said that its opinions are protected as free speech.be free to do sth Members of the public buying direct from an insurer are free to inquire about its security rating.
something that is free is available to be used because no one else is using it: Is this desk free?
not in a fixed position or not joined to anything: free to do sth With the autocue, your hands and head are free to communicate body language more powerfully.
not doing anything planned or important: free to do sth Are you free to attend tomorrow's board meeting?
not having something that is unwanted: free from sth Members must be free from politics and outside influences when making decisions.free of sth They proved through testing that their products were free of contamination.
there's no such thing as a free lunch used to say that nothing is free even if it appears to be, for example, if someone gives you something they probably want something back from you in return
→  See also free ride noun
(Definition of free adjective from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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