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English definition of “full”

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full

adjective
 
 
/fʊl/
complete or whole: the full amount/cost Only people without health insurance are charged the full amount.the full benefit/impact It is still not known what the full impact of the economic sanctions will be on the domestic economy. Officials said the airline was operating at full capacity yesterday. If the customer kept the items for the full 90 days that many stores allow for a return, the season for a particular fashion might have passed.
containing a lot of detail or all the necessary details: Please include your full name and address with your order. For full details, please visit our website.
full price [C or U] a price that has not been reduced: Customers who do not have a proof of age card have to pay full price.
at full stretch working as hard as possible, or using all available money, materials, time, etc.: be/work at full stretch Plants are continuing to work at full stretch to meet both domestic and export demand. They claimed they were operating at full stretch and could not afford to lower rates as margins were already pared to the bone .
in full completely: The bill must be paid in full by the end of the month.
(Definition of full from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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