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English definition of “interview”

interview

noun [C]
 
 
/ˈɪntəvjuː/
HR, WORKPLACE a meeting in which someone asks you questions to see if you are suitable for a job or a course: an interview for sth She has an interview for a new job tomorrow.an interview with sb Before getting a place at university, you may have to have an interview with the head of department. to be called for/invited for/selected for an interview She was very highly qualified, but didn't even get an interview. a job interviews Your second interview is likely to be more challenging than your first interview. interview techniques
MARKETING a conversation in which someone is asked their opinion about a product or service, so that it can be improved or better advertised: carry out/conduct interviews The company conducted research and interviews with customers throughout the country. a face-to-face/telephone interview
COMMUNICATIONS a conversation in which someone is asked questions about themselves or a subject they know about for a newspaper article, television show, etc.: an interview with sb/sth He made the allegations in an interview with the New York Times.an interview about sth I read an interesting interview about Smith's views on the oil industry.take part in/give an interview He never gives interviews. Company officials refused a request for an interview. a newspaper/radio/television interview
→ See also depth interview, exit interview, flyback interview, screening interview, semi-structured interview, situational interview
(Definition of interview noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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