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English definition of “leave”

leave

noun [U]
 
 
/liːv/
WORKPLACE, HR a period of time that someone is allowed away from work for holiday, illness, or another special reason: take leave from sth I'm taking 5 days' unpaid leave from work to go to the wedding.be/go on leave from sth Benefits will need to be adjusted when an employee is on leave from their job. The appointee will be entitled to 38 days of annual leave. Higher maternity pay and a longer leave entitlement are likely outcomes of the review. adoption/bereavement/child-care leave educational/medical leave paid/unpaid leave
formal agreement or permission to do something: be given/granted leave to do sth She has been granted leave to remain in the country. No application should be issued without my leave.
be placed/put on leave WORKPLACE, HR to be told to take time away from work, usually because you have been accused of doing something wrong: The director of financial aid was recently placed on leave for accepting consulting fees from a loan company.
leave to appeal LAW permission to formally ask for a legal or official decision to be changed: The defendant was given 14 days' leave to appeal against the decision.
→ See also administrative leave, compassionate leave, family leave, gardening leave, maternity leave, parental leave, paternity leave, sabbatical, sick leave, special leave
(Definition of leave noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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