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English definition of “licence”

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licence

noun
 
 
/ˈlaɪsəns/ UK ( US license)
[C] LAW, GOVERNMENT an official document from the government, court, etc. that gives you permission to do, have, or own something: a driving/driver's/pilot's licence The bank will insist you produce a driving licence or passport as a form of ID. a business/operating licence a gun/firearms licence If there is any delay, the licence holder can be fined.grant/issue a licence The council granted a licence that allowed the premises to stay open until 3 am. have/hold/get a licence own/apply for/renew a licence refuse/suspend/take away a licence a licence expires/runs out →  Compare permit noun
[C] LAW, COMMERCE, IT permission given by a company to produce or use something that they have created or that belongs to them: a software/publishing licencelicence for sth A licence for PC network use costs £900.licence to do sth a licence to publish the book throughout the world
[ U] permission or freedom to do what you want: licence to do sth He thought his position allowed him licence to be rude.
licence to print money usually disapproving a situation in which a person or organization is given the permission or opportunity to become very rich without much effort: Healthcare should not be seen as a licence to print money for the private sector.
under licence LAW, COMMERCE with permission from the person or company who has created a product: It can appoint a foreign company to manufacture its product under licence.
→  See also export licence , import licence , letter of licence , practicing license
(Definition of licence from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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