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English definition of “link”

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link

noun [C]
 
 
/lɪŋk/
TRANSPORT, COMMUNICATIONS a way of travelling or communicating between two places or systems: a bus/rail/road link transport/transportation linkslink between sth (and sth) There are plans to upgrade the road links between the two countries. a phone/video link Interviews can be carried out by video link. This device creates a link between computers, enabling you to share files, no matter what their size.
[usually plural] a relationship between two or more people, countries, companies, etc.: link with sb/sth Their links with Britain are still strong.build/establish/strengthen links We need to strengthen our links with colleges doing similar work to ours. business/trade links
a connection between two or more facts, events, etc.: link between sth (and sth) The key thing here is the link between consumer confidence and spending on non-essentials.direct/clear/strong link There is a direct link between the value of the used car and new car prices for the same model.clear/close/strong link Historical data show the clear link between income tax rates and the size of domestic government spending.
INTERNET, IT a word or image in an electronic document or on a website that you can click on to take you to another part of the document, another document, or another website: Read this tutorial for web developers in order to find out how to add a link to another website. Click on this link to visit our online bookstore. →  See also hotlink , hyperlink noun
(Definition of link noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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