Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “loss”

See all translations

loss

noun
 
 
/lɒs/
[C or U] a situation in which you no longer have something or have less of something, or the process that causes this: The loss of jobs in the convenience food industry seems inevitable.loss of earnings/income/pay She received compensation for loss of earnings through the illness.a loss in sth The new road will cause losses in economic value to many local properties.
[C] FINANCE, COMMERCE a situation in which a business or an organization spends more money than it earns, or loses money in another way: announce/post/report a loss (of sth) The company announced a loss of €1.3m last year. a loss in revenue big/financial/heavy losses a net/operating loss a pre-tax/after-tax lossincur/make/realize a loss In a bid to attract customers, some insurers may even be making a loss on contracts marketed to certain key buyers. a loss on an investment/a sale
[C] STOCK MARKET a situation in which the value of shares goes down: a loss in sth Gains in oil and gas were partly offset by losses in consumer products and precious metals.
[U] INSURANCE a situation in which property is damaged, lost, or stolen, and an insurance company must pay to replace it: We will cover your house contents against accidental loss or damage during the removal.
[C] a disadvantage caused by someone leaving an organization: be a loss to sb/sth It would be a great loss to the department if you left.
loss of face a situation in which someone loses the respect of other people because of something they have done: His first deal with the company had turned into a very public loss of face. →  See also lose
(Definition of loss from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of loss?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “loss” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

work out

to exercise in order to improve the strength or appearance of your body

Word of the Day

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Read More 

bio-inspiration noun

April 13, 2015
the adoption of patterns and structures found in nature for the purposes of engineering, manufacturing, science, etc. The MIT researchers actually aren’t the only robotics team to turn to cheetahs for bio-inspiration.

Read More