low adjective Meaning in Cambridge Business English Dictionary
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Meaning of "low" - Business English Dictionary

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low

adjective
 
 
/ləʊ/
below the usual or expected level or amount: The offer was rejected on the grounds that it was too low.low inflation/interest rates/taxes The housing boom coincided with a flat economy, low inflation, and a falling stock market. Interest rates fell to their lowest level since records began in January 1975.low prices/costs/fees Higher profits and lower prices lift demand and keep inflation in check. The manufacturing industry has been hit by low productivity, falling sales and mounting losses. Developers are focusing on building more affordable housing targeted at families on low incomes. These dedicated staff put up with long hours and low pay, because they love the job.low unemployment/crime Unemployment in the region is lower than the national average.
not very good or acceptable: low quality/standards Attempts at voluntary regulation had failed because too many companies with low standards had not joined the system.
not important because of being at the bottom of a range or group of things: Transport was a low priority for the new administration. More flexible working conditions are changing the traditionally low status of part-time jobs.
be/get/run low (on sth) to have very little of something left: Gas stations were running low on supplies due to the blockade. This symbol means the printer ink is getting low.
→  Compare high adjective
(Definition of low adjective from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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