mail noun - definition in the Business English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “mail”

See all translations

mail

noun
 
 
/meɪl/
[U or S] ( UK also post) COMMUNICATIONS a system for sending letters and packages from place to place: Individuals using the mail to commit fraud are brought up on federal charges.in/through the mail The cheque is in the mail.by mail I could deliver it to you next week, or send it by mail today. domestic/internal/international mail
[U or S] ( UK also post) COMMUNICATIONS the letters and packages which are sent by post: deliver/forward/send (sb) mail Please tell the post office to forward all mail to our new address.get/receive mail We prefer to receive mail at our home office rather than in our stores.check/open/read your mail If you check your mail on the way out, you can deposit any cheques you find in it. deal with/handle the mailincoming/outgoing mail Outgoing mail should be marked with your department's code.express/first-class/second-class mail The cost of first-class mail will rise next year. business/private mail
[U] COMMUNICATIONS, INTERNET →  email : You have mail. check/reply to/read your mailmail message/client/server You need the address of your mail server before you can set up an account.
Mail used in the name of some newspapers: The Daily Mail The Hull Mail
→  See also airmail , bulk mail , certified mail , direct mail , email , flame mail , junk mail , mailing , post , registered mail , snail mail , surface mail
(Definition of mail noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of mail?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “mail” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

airwaves

the radio waves used for broadcasting radio and television programmes, or, more generally, radio or television broadcasting time

Word of the Day

They sometimes go here and they never go there: using adverbs of frequency

by Liz Walter,
April 29, 2015
Sometimes, always, often, never: these are some of the most common words in English.  Unfortunately, they are also some of the words that cause the most problems for students. Many of my students put them in the wrong place, often because that’s where they go in their own languages. They say things

Read More 

e-juice noun

April 27, 2015
the liquid content in an e-cigarette, which includes nicotine and may be flavoured in various ways Contestants…suck on a modified vaper until they’ve filled their chest cavity with enough vaporised nicotine “e-juice” to shoot out a belch of white smoke upwards of 4ft long.

Read More