mail noun Meaning in Cambridge Business English Dictionary
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Meaning of "mail" - Business English Dictionary

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mail

noun
 
 
/meɪl/
[U or S] ( UK also post) COMMUNICATIONS a system for sending letters and packages from place to place: Individuals using the mail to commit fraud are brought up on federal charges.in/through the mail The cheque is in the mail.by mail I could deliver it to you next week, or send it by mail today. domestic/internal/international mail
[U or S] ( UK also post) COMMUNICATIONS the letters and packages which are sent by post: deliver/forward/send (sb) mail Please tell the post office to forward all mail to our new address.get/receive mail We prefer to receive mail at our home office rather than in our stores.check/open/read your mail If you check your mail on the way out, you can deposit any cheques you find in it. deal with/handle the mailincoming/outgoing mail Outgoing mail should be marked with your department's code.express/first-class/second-class mail The cost of first-class mail will rise next year. business/private mail
[U] COMMUNICATIONS, INTERNET →  email : You have mail. check/reply to/read your mailmail message/client/server You need the address of your mail server before you can set up an account.
Mail used in the name of some newspapers: The Daily Mail The Hull Mail
→  See also airmail , bulk mail , certified mail , direct mail , email , flame mail , junk mail , mailing , post , registered mail , snail mail , surface mail
(Definition of mail noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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