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English definition of “margin”

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margin

noun [C]
 
 
/ˈmɑːdʒɪn/
the amount by which one thing is more or less than another: by a margin of sth The president won the election by a tiny margin.a wide/large/comfortable margin They are the largest building society by a comfortable margin. a narrow/small/slim margina 40-vote/5-point/2-to-1, etc. margin On the New York Stock Exchange, declines outpaced gainers by a 4-3 margin. Kennedy's margin of victory was only 719,000.
ACCOUNTING, COMMERCE the difference between the total cost of making and selling something and the price it is sold for: a low/poor margin Intense competition leads to lower prices and margins.a high/good margin They wanted to produce higher margin products.a margin on sth The company will make a whopping 80% margin on this sale. Our increased profits are due to improved margins.
BANKING the difference between the amount of a loan and the value of the collateral (= property to be given to the lender if the money is not paid back): The risk of default needs to be correctly priced in the bank's loan margins.
FINANCE, STOCK MARKET money, shares, etc. that a client gives to a broker to hold, that protect the broker from loss on a contract →  Compare margin account
on margin FINANCE If you buy shares on margin, you borrow money in order to do this: Executives bought stocks on margin, putting up cash for only 10 per cent of the purchase price.
→  See also gross margin , net interest margin , net margin , operating margin , profit margin
(Definition of margin from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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