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English definition of “measure”

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measure

noun
 
 
/ˈmeʒər/
[C, usually plural] a way of achieving something, or a method for dealing with a situation: These measures were designed to improve car safety. We will introduce measures to reduce noise levels in the factory. The company will need to take further measures to cut costs.austerity/cost-cutting measures It had taken a series of cost-cutting measures, including closing one of its two plants. drastic/draconian/radical measures preventative/safety/security measures
[C] MEASURES a unit used for giving the size, weight, etc. of something: weights and measures The standard measure of efficiency in the airline industry is 'cost per passenger mile'.
[C or U] an amount or level of something: There was a large measure of agreement between the two sides in the negotiation.
[C] a way of judging something: Record sales are not always a measure of a singer's popularity.get a measure of sth It is difficult to get an accurate measure of employee performance in this industry.a good/true/reliable measure Exports as a percentage of total sales are a good measure of international competitiveness.
for good measure if something is given or done for good measure, it is given or done in addition to other things: They're offering a good salary, with a company car thrown in for good measure.
have the measure of sb/sth to understand what someone or something is like and to know how to deal with them: The other team were experienced negotiators, but we had the measure of them.
→  See also countermeasure , dry measure , made-to-measure
(Definition of measure noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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