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English definition of “meeting”

meeting

noun [C]
 
 
/ˈmiːtɪŋ/ MEETINGS
an occasion when a group of people meet in order to discuss something: In a statement issued after the meeting, the board announced their decision to go ahead with the merger .have/hold a meeting The FSA will hold a meeting to discuss possible compensation payouts on Monday.at/in/during a meeting A framework agreement will be signed next week during a meeting of EU foreign ministers.last/next meeting There was speculation that the Fed may cut its lending rate from 5.25% before its next meeting. a meeting with sb The bank announced the expanded cost cuts in a meeting with analysts after the close of trading.a meeting between sb/sth and sb/sth No meeting has yet taken place between senior management and union representatives.be in/go to/attend a meeting Over 200 people attended the meeting at the company's headquarters in San Diego.schedule/arrange/cancel a meeting We will be holding a meeting next week with industry analysts.chair a meeting He chaired a meeting of senior Ministers last Thursday to discuss five-year plans for reforms.a meeting of leaders/delegates/shareholders Two new directors were elected to the board at the annual meeting of shareholders. a board/committee/shareholder meeting monthly/weekly meetings an informal/formal/official meeting a high-level/top-level meeting an upcoming/scheduled meeting → See also annual general meeting, annual meeting, annual stockholders' meeting, company meeting, creditors' meeting, general meeting, extraordinary general meeting, statutory meeting, stop-work meeting
(Definition of meeting from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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