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English definition of “mobility”

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mobility

noun [U]
 
 
/məˈbɪlɪti/
ECONOMICS the fact that it is easy for someone to change their situation, for example by doing different work, becoming part of a different social class, or moving to a different place: Some employment systems require more flexibility and mobility than others.class/social/economic mobility The government thinks higher education means more social mobility.upward/downward mobility Widespread upward mobility has meant that mobile phones and automobiles are considered normal purchases.
the fact that it is easy to move or transport something from one place to another, or to use it for a different purpose: I prefer the mobility of a handheld camera. In a world of capital mobility, bilateral trade figures don't really tell you very much.
IT, COMMUNICATIONS, E-COMMERCE the ability to have particular services available on a phone or a computer used while travelling from place to place, without being connected by wires: Consumers are demanding mobility, so that they can have access to information wherever they are.
→  Compare immobility →  See also labour mobility
Translations of “mobility”
in Korean 유동성…
in Arabic تَنقُّل…
in Portuguese mobilidade…
in Catalan mobilitat…
in Japanese 動けること…
in Italian mobilità…
in Chinese (Traditional) 活動性,流動性…
in Chinese (Simplified) 活动性…
(Definition of mobility from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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