Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “move”

move

noun
 
 
/muːv/
[C] action that a person or organization takes in order to achieve something: a move to do sth Moves to block free access to music on the Internet have met with limited success.a move by sb/sth Economists said a move by Japan to cut interest rates in isolation would have little effect on currency levels.make a move (to do sth) Moves are being made to help future doctors make objective decisions.first/next/latest move Our next move will crucially depend on the latest figures for inflation.a bold/strategic/dramatic move Strategic moves announced with the interim results should strengthen the balance sheet and improve cash flow.a move comes/follows The company's move comes as part of a wider industry crackdown on insurance fraud.applaud/approve/condemn a move Investors are expected to applaud the move.
[S] the process of changing from one system, activity, etc. to another: a move to/into sth Environmentalists have welcomed the move to congestion charging.a move (away) from sth We have incorporated several new concepts in recent months, including a move from commission-only staff to a team bonus structure.
[C] the process of changing the place where you live or work, or trading in a new place: a move from/to/into a place The move into Italy is part of a wider international expansion.
→ See also block move, career move
(Definition of move noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of move?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “move” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

bright spark

a person who is intelligent, and full of energy and enthusiasm

Word of the Day

Highly delighted, bitterly disappointed, ridiculously cheap: adverbs for emphasis.

by Liz Walter,
October 22, 2014
We often make adjectives stronger by putting an adverb in front of them. The most common ones are very and, for a stronger meaning, extremely: He was very pleased. The ship is extremely large. However, we don’t use very or extremely for adjectives that already have a strong meaning, for example fantastic,

Read More 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Read More