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English definition of “outline”

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outline

verb [T]
 
 
/ˈaʊtlaɪn/
to describe something, for example a new plan or idea, in a general way without giving too many details: The government has outlined a series of environmental goals it is seeking to meet by 2020.(be) outlined in sth Recommendations outlined in the recent report have angered investors.outline a plan/proposal/strategy Senior figures from the energy industry will hold a public meeting to outline plans to build a $300m plant.outline the terms of sth The Department of Agriculture yesterday outlined the terms of a new consent agreement.(be) outlined by sb/sth The commission's position was outlined by its general counsel, Julie Hodgkins.(be) outlined above/below When planning objectives, it's a good idea to use a checklist to ensure that you meet the criteria outlined above.outline how/what/when, etc. The Pensions Board will be obliged to outline how future pensions systems might operate.
if a drawing or diagram outlines something, it shows its general appearance or shape: Maps filed with the Planning Commission outline a 154,000-square-foot hospital that could eventually be on the site's northern end.
(Definition of outline verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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