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English definition of “pass”

pass

verb
 
 
/pɑːs/ US   /pæs/
[I or T] to go past something or someone or move in relation to it or them: I was just passing by, so I thought I'd drop in for a chat.
[T] to go past a particular point in time: Don't buy goods which have passed their sell-by date.
[T] to go past something by being greater in amount or degree: As the world's largest convenience store chain, it just passed McDonald's in the number of worldwide outlets.pass the $1m/€100m/£10bn, etc. mark The company is expected to pass the $10m mark by the end of this year.
[I] if you say a situation or feeling will pass, you mean it will disappear: We're in a difficult economic situation, but it will pass eventually.
[I or T] to be successful in an examination, course, etc.: All interviewees need to pass a basic math and literacy test.
[T] to give something to someone: Could you pass me that file, please?
[T] if you pass money, you give someone false or stolen money without telling them: Police have warned businesses that someone is passing stolen checks in the area.
[I] when time passes, it goes past: A lot of time has passed since we opened our first store.
[T] if you pass time, you spend time doing something: With more people passing time in the terminal, airport officials try to make them comfortable.
[T] to give approval to something, especially by voting to make it law: California passed a law in September to cut carbon dioxide emissions by 25%.
[I] to choose not to answer a question: pass on sth Asked whether he thought the FA should intervene, he replied diplomatically: 'Can I pass on this one?'
[I] to change from one condition to another: pass from sth to sth As new electronic gadgets fall in price, they pass from a niche product to a mass product.
(Definition of pass verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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