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English definition of “portfolio”

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portfolio

noun [C]
 
 
/ˌpɔːtˈfəʊliəʊ/ ( plural portfolios)
FINANCE a collection of different investments that are owned by a particular person or organization: an investment portfolio a property portfolio have/hold a portfolio These funds are less risky because you hold a portfolio selected and monitored by a specialist manager. build (up) a portfolio You could build up a portfolio including UK funds.a balanced/diversified portfolio It's a diversified portfolio, which will lower the risk.a global/international portfolio These funds are impossible to ignore if you want a broad international portfolio.a bond/stock/share portfolio These shares should amount to no more than 10 or 20% of a stock portfolio.
COMMERCE, FINANCE the range of products or services that a company offers, or the businesses that someone owns: Customer reaction to our product portfolio has been extremely positive. The hotel group's brand portfolio includes about 15 complementary brands, from luxury to budget hotels.strong/broad portfolio We will continue to have a strong portfolio of businesses with an annual turnover of approximately £1.65bn. build up/expand a portfolio He and associates want to build up a portfolio of money-making websites.
GOVERNMENT the particular job or area of responsibility that a member of a government has : One of the most significant changes is in the trade portfolio.
(Definition of portfolio from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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