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English definition of “question”

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question

noun
 
 
/ˈkwestʃən/
[C] a sentence or phrase that asks for information: ask (sb) a question Can I ask a question, Gail?answer a question Not one assistant correctly answered all the questions they were asked.have a question Does anybody have any questions?
[C] a subject or problem: We return to the question of whether pay for performance really motivates employees. One very difficult question is how to charge market prices for energy.
[C, U] a feeling of doubt about something: There is some question as to what is the best strategy. The ethics of some of his business deals are open to question.raise questions about sth His evidence raised questions about the credibility of a key eyewitness. →  See also scaled question
bring/call sth into question to express doubt about something: If somebody calls something into question, then let's stop and review it. to make people feel doubt about something: The chief executive's popularity has sunk to levels that bring his legitimacy into question.
in question that is being discussed: For shareholders of the company in question the idea of a takeover must be appealing. if something is in question, no-one knows what is going to happen to it: The automaker's future remains in question.
out of the question if something is out of the question, it definitely will not or cannot happen: A pay rise is out of the question.
(Definition of question noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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