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English definition of “receipt”

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receipt

noun
 
 
/rɪˈsiːt/
[C] ( US sales slip, sales check) COMMERCE a piece of paper that shows the price of something that you have bought and proves that you have paid for it: Can I have a receipt?get/keep/retain a receipt Always get a receipt when you withdraw cash from a machine. a credit card receipt
[U] the act of receiving something: I acknowledge receipt of the sum of £10,000. Land stock of low initial cost may rise a hundredfold in value upon receipt of planning approval. We will send an acknowledgement within two working days of receipt.
receipts ACCOUNTING the total amount of money received by a business or government: The economy experienced lower than expected export receipts. Tobacco tax receipts fell by $6.9 million or about 1.1%. cash/box-office receiptsreceipts rise/fall According to OECD figures, receipts rose in 17 out of 24 advanced economies in 2005.
→  See also credit receipt , delivery receipt , deposit receipt , depository receipt , dock receipt , gross receipts , net receipts , trust receipt , warehouse receipt
Translations of “receipt”
in Korean 영수증…
in Arabic إيصال…
in French réception, reçu…
in Turkish fiş, makbuz, teslim alma…
in Italian ricevuta, scontrino fiscale…
in Chinese (Traditional) 收據, 發票, 收條…
in Russian квитанция, чек, получение…
in Polish paragon, pokwitowanie, odbiór…
in Spanish recibo, recepción…
in Portuguese recibo…
in German der Empfang, die Quittung…
in Catalan rebut…
in Japanese 領収書, レシート…
in Chinese (Simplified) 收据, 发票, 收条…
(Definition of receipt from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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