release verb Meaning in Cambridge Business English Dictionary
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Meaning of "release" - Business English Dictionary

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release

verb [T]
 
 
/rɪˈliːs/
COMMUNICATIONS to make information available to the public: According to a study released last week, nearly 250,000 Britons emigrated last year.release a statement/document/report The conservation group released a report accusing petroleum companies of causing widespread pollution.release details/figures/findings Figures released by the Council of Mortgage Lenders show that fixed-rate products accounted for 78% of mortgages in August. Copies of the correspondence between the attorneys have now been released to the media.
COMMERCE to start to sell a new product: Only a very small percentage of the software games released each year actually make money.release a CD/DVD/movie The record company has just released a CD that brings together the artist's solo and collaborative work.
FINANCE to make money available to be spent: A spokesman for the transport group said new debt arrangements would release €500 million. Selling their home to release the equity is some people's only way of funding their living expenses in old age.
PRODUCTION to produce gases or chemical substances as part of a manufacturing or industrial process: Many industrial processes are still releasing great quantities of carbon dioxide.
to officially say that someone no longer has a job, position, or responsibility: release sb from sth The club has agreed to release three of its players from contract.
(Definition of release verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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