rent verb Meaning in Cambridge Business English Dictionary
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Meaning of "rent" - Business English Dictionary

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rent

verb
 
 
/rent/
[I or T] PROPERTY to pay a fixed amount of money regularly for the use of a room, house, office, etc.: Researchers said there was a growing divide between the home-owning majority and people who rent. Regardless of the boom in UK property prices, it is still cheaper to buy rather than rent a house.rent sth from sb She has been renting an apartment from a private landlord through a letting agent. A surprising number of storage units are rented by salesmen.
[T] ( also rent sth out) PROPERTY to receive an amount of money from somebody for the use of something, especially a room, house, office, etc. that you own: rent sth to sb She runs a commercial real estate company that rents office space to businesses.rent sth for sth She rents out one of her rooms to students. He renovated the three-storey building and rents it out as apartments. Each of these centres rents out farm machinery to local farmers at low cost.
[T] ( UK usually hire) COMMERCE to pay to use something for a short period of time: rent a car/an automobile I rented a car at Millennium Park and headed off to explore the island.
[I] US PROPERTY to be available for someone to use for a particular amount of money: rent at/for sth The rooms rented at a premium of $25 to $35 over regular rates.rent for sth Rooms that regularly rent for $59 a night suddenly cost $300 a night.
(Definition of rent verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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