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English definition of “revenue”

revenue

noun
 
 
/ˈrevənjuː/ US   /ˈrevənuː/
[C or U] (also revenues) FINANCE, ACCOUNTING money that a company receives, especially from selling goods or services: revenue(s) from sth Revenue from online ads is much less than from print advertising.revenue(s) of Analysts had forecast revenue of $1.39bn.in revenue(s) His firm posted $41 million in revenues last year.generate/bring in/raise revenue(s) The sport doesn't generate much revenue from ticket sales.boost/increase revenue(s) The banking group has in recent years struggled to boost revenues while keeping costs under control. a fall/increase in revenue(s) The company has an estimated annual revenue of $50 million. Advertising revenue fell last year. expected/projected revenue a source of revenue
[C or U] (also revenues) TAX money that a government receives from taxes: They need to restructure the tax system to collect more revenue. There is extra pressure on the Chancellor to find new ways to raise revenue. State officials predicted a 5% growth in tax revenues. Other taxes will have to be raised to compensate for the lost revenue.
[S] (also the Revenue) TAX, GOVERNMENT the government department in the UK that collects taxes: Taxpayers should always check the documents they get from the Revenue.
→ See also average revenue, HM Revenue & Customs, Internal Revenue Service, marginal revenue, sales revenue
(Definition of revenue from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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