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English definition of “revised”

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revised

adjective
 
 
/rɪˈvaɪzd/
a revised amount or value has been changed in order to make it more accurate: The overpayment will be returned through revised deductions, starting this month. The governor is expected to propose a revised budget within a month. The global deficit on trade in goods fell to £6.5 billion, from an upwardly revised £7 billion in May. a revised figure/forecast/estimate a revised offer/bid/targeta revised 1.8%/$4.6bn/£6m, etc. Retail sales bounced back from a revised 0.2% decline in August to post a larger-than-expected 0.7% rise in September.
a revised plan, system, or law has been changed in order to improve it: revised plans/proposals/guidelines revised laws/regulations/legislation a revised deal/contract/agreement
a document, book, etc. that has been revised has been changed in order to improve it, correct mistakes, or make it contain the most recent information: revised edition/version/draft This paper is a revised version of a report commissioned by the Economic Development Institute of the World Bank.
Translations of “revised”
in Chinese (Traditional) 修正過的, 經過修改的…
in Chinese (Simplified) 修正过的, 经过修改的…
(Definition of revised from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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