run verb Meaning in Cambridge Business English Dictionary
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Meaning of "run" - Business English Dictionary

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run

verb
 
 
/rʌn/ (running, ran, run)
[I or T] to operate, or make something operate: Keep clear of the fans while they're running. Do you know how to run this sort of machinery? We've run the computer program, but nothing happens.
[T] MANAGEMENT to be in control of or manage something: He's been running his own company since he left school. She left me to run the store while she went on her lunch break. well-run/poorly-rungovernment-run/family-run/student-run The restaurant is a family-run business. privately-run/publicly-run/professionally-run
[I or T] TRANSPORT to travel or move in a particular way, or cause something to do this: Trains are still running, despite the snow. A bus runs into town three times a day. We're running four more trains than usual to accommodate the high number of passengers.
[I or T] to continue or happen, or cause something to continue or happen in a particular way: A magazine subscription usually runs for one year. We'll be running the course for another year.run smoothly/run according to plan To ensure that these projects run smoothly, executives are now encouraged to attend training courses.
[T] to take something to a person or place: run sth over/out/down, etc. to sb/sth Can you run these orders over to the warehouse, please?
[I] to be or continue at or near a particular level: run at sth Inflation has been running at 2% for the past year. Supplies are running low.
[T] to show something in a newspaper or magazine, on television, etc.: run a story/article/piece They ran the advertisement on all the major networks for a month.
[I] POLITICS, GOVERNMENT to try to be elected to government or other position in an election: run for sth He ran for state Attorney General in 2010. Meyers decided to run for office again the following year.run against sb She is running against a multi-millionaire businessman.
run a check (on sb/sth) to look through records to find out facts about someone or something: We run background checks on all prospective employees.
run a test (on sth) to perform a scientific examination to determine if something works, someone is healthy, etc.: We ran performance tests on the preproduction machine, which performed well. Doctors ran tests to try to determine if the workers' health problems were work-related.
run a deficit/surplus ECONOMICS, GOVERNMENT if a government runs a deficit or surplus, it has less or more money in its accounts than it needs: The previous government was happy to run a huge deficit for years.
run a/the risk of doing sth to be in a situation in which there is the possibility that something bad might happen: A company without good customer service runs the risk of losing its customers' good will.
run a tight ship to control a business or other organization firmly and effectively: The woman who manages the post room runs a very tight ship.
run your eye over sth to look quickly at the whole of something: Would you mind running your eye over this agreement before I sign it?
be running late to be unable to get to a place by the agreed or expected time
run around in circles informal to be very active without achieving any good results: Peter's been running round in circles since half his department resigned.
run out of time to have no time left to finish something or get to a place: We're running out of time - the report has to be ready for the meeting tonight.
run short (of sth) to have a low supply of something: Forecasting is crucial: you don't want to run short or have a warehouse of unsold product. The online travel site denies that it is running short of cash.
run the numbers FINANCE to do calculations in order to decide whether a particular plan is financially practical: She ran the numbers and decided to re-finance her mortgage.
run the rule over sth to examine something to see if it is good enough or right for a particular purpose: A number of bidders are understood to be running the rule over the company.
run the show informal to be the leader in control of a group of people doing something: If you need help, ask Mark - he's running the show.
→  See also up adjective , run across sb , run across sth , run around , run sth by/past sb , run down , run into sb , run into sth , run sth off , run on , run out , run over sth , run through sth , run to sth , run sth up , run up against sth , run with sth
(Definition of run verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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