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English definition of “safety”

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safety

noun [U]
 
 
/ˈseɪfti/
the state of being protected from danger or harm: You have a right to be protected against anything that can affect your safety. public/passenger/consumer safety
the condition of not being likely to cause damage or harm: the safety of sth Many people are wondering about the safety of some food imports. food/drug/product safety fire safety Apart from this one incident, the company has an excellent safety record.
used before a noun to describe equipment, rules, etc. that are designed to keep people from being harmed: safety glasses The company is now a world leader in car safety seats. The iron's best safety feature is that it shuts off automatically. The building is not compliant with the new safety standards. The law requires a certificate showing that the latest safety tests have been carried out. safety procedures.
air/workplace/mine, etc. safety the fact of keeping people safe in a particular place: Fletcher is an independent mine safety consultant in New Zealand. We always make air safety our first priority.
→  See also health and safety , margin of safety
Translations of “safety”
in Korean 안전…
in Arabic أمان…
in Portuguese segurança…
in Catalan seguretat…
in Japanese 安全, 無事…
in Italian sicurezza…
in Chinese (Traditional) 安全,平安…
in Russian безопасность…
in Turkish güvenlik, emniyet, güvenlilik…
in Chinese (Simplified) 安全,平安…
in Polish bezpieczeństwo…
(Definition of safety from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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