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English definition of “season”

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season

noun [C]
 
 
/ˈsiːzən/
a period of the year when a particular activity or event happens: the autumn/spring/summer/winter season Travel agents are offering tempting discounts to persuade holidaymakers to book early for the 2013 season. the holiday/tourist season Stores are hoping for a strong Holiday buying season. Cotton farmers have prospered from a long growing season.
FINANCE one of the times during the year when companies announce their financial results: The bank started the half-year reporting season for UK retail banks on Friday with its announcement of increased profits.
the time in each year when new styles of clothes, hair, etc. become fashionable: The fashion business moves so quickly that nobody can remember last season's look.
in season if fruit and vegetables are in season, they are being produced in the area, and are available and ready to eat: It is unacceptable for carrots to be imported when they are in season in the UK. at the time of the year when many people want to travel or have a holiday: The bar is open daily in season.
out of season if fruit and vegetables are out of season, they do not grow in the area at that time of the year: out-of-season vegetables Some produce travels halfway across the world so that we can eat fruits and vegetables out of season. during the period of the year when fewer people want to travel or have a holiday: There has been an increase in the number of retired people taking holidays out of season.
→  See also dead season , high season , low season , off season
(Definition of season from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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