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English definition of “sign on”

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sign on

phrasal verb with sign
 
 
/saɪn/ verb
UK informal to sign a form at a government office to say that you do not have a job and that you want to receive benefits: After Jack was made redundant, he signed on for eight months.
( also sign up) to agree to start doing a new activity or job or start using a new system: Major advertisers have already signed on.sign on to sth Reims is one of the largest towns to sign on to electronic voting.sign on as sth Big-name industries are signing on as corporate partners.
( also sign up) to sign a document saying that you have an agreement with a particular organization: sign on with sth She's signed on with a temp agency.
IT to start using a computer system or website, especially by giving your name and a password: Provided you ensure that noone sees your PC screen when you sign on, internet banking is just as safe as any other form of banking.sign on to sth On any given week, from 250,000 to 500,000 users sign on to the network.
(Definition of sign on from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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