start verb Meaning in Cambridge Business English Dictionary
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Meaning of "start" - Business English Dictionary

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start

verb
 
 
/stɑːt/
[I or T] HR, WORKPLACE to begin to work in a job: Can you start on Monday? I recently started a new job and I'm enjoying it very much so far. Entry-level employees start at low salaries.
start work WORKPLACE to begin to be employed for the first time: He started work at 16 in a local baker's. to begin your day at work: I start work at 8.30 in the morning.
[I or T] to begin an activity or a set of activities: He started the talk with a review of the past year's achievements.start by doing sth She started by thanking us all for attending.
[I or T] ( also start up) if a business or other organization starts, or if someone starts one, it is created and starts to operate: start a business/company She started her own software company last year. The economic model of small, farmer-owned ethanol plants got the industry started. →  See also start-up
[I ] to begin at one level and then move to another: prices start at/from sth Ticket prices start at €20 and go up to €100.
[I or T] ( also start off, also start out) to begin in a particular way and then change later: He started his working life as an engineer, but later became a teacher.start as sth The company started as a snow removal business with one truck, and grew from there.start with sth He started with nothing and was a millionaire by the time he was 35.
[I or T] if a machine or vehicle starts, or you start it, it begins to work or operate: I started the computer and checked my mail.
(Definition of start verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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